A scientist walks into a bar…and sees dozens of solutions. She orders one.

Wednesday, February 24th, 7pm

Please visit the Facebook event for the zoom information and meeting link.


All My Favorite Science Teachers Are Undead

Why horror (not horrible) teachers?

What are some science concepts even the shallowest horror movies can get us thinking deeply about?

Is Jaws actually a vampire?

Raychelle Burks is a professor of chemistry at American University. After working in a crime lab, Dr. Burks returned to academia, teaching, and forensic science research. An analytical chemist, she enjoys the challenge developing detection methods for a wide-variety of compounds. Her research team is focused on the development of colorimetric and luminescent sensor arrays for the detection of analytes of mainly forensic and national security interests with accompanying image and chemometric analysis. To maximize the portability of their analytical systems, Dr. Burks’ team uses laptops, tablets, and smartphones for image collection and data processing. Beyond forensics and national security, there are a variety of fields where low cost and reliable rapid screening methods are needed. Dr. Burks collaborates with colleagues in a variety of fields in furtherance to provide application-specific sensing systems employing portable, imaging-based detection. Dr. Burks is a popular science communicator, appearing on TV, in podcasts, at large genre cons such as DragonCon and GeekGirlCon, in addition to writing a science-meets-true crime column called “Trace Analysis” for Chemistry World. She is a member of a number of local, national, and international committees, task forces, and projects focused on social justice and STEM.

SciTech Cafe events are open to any one with a curious mind regardless of age and background.  Our events, prizes, and snacks are free, but donations are appreciated. 

The SciTech Cafe is sponsored by:

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CHM
Gomez